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Match Made at Birth? What Traits of a Million Swedes Tell Us About CEOs

Subject

Finance

Publishing details

Social Sciences Research Network

Authors / Editors

Adams R;Keloharju M;Knupfer S

Publication Year

2014

Abstract

This paper analyzes the role three personal traits — cognitive and non-cognitive ability, and height — play in the market for CEOs. We merge data on the traits of more than one million Swedish males, measured at age 18 in a mandatory military enlistment test, with comprehensive data on their income, education, profession, and service as a CEO of any Swedish company. We find that the traits of large-company CEOs are at par or higher than those of other high-caliber professions. For example, large-company CEOs have about the same cognitive ability, and about one-half of a standard deviation higher non-cognitive ability and height than medical doctors. Their traits compare even more favorably with those of lawyers. The traits contribute to pay in two ways. First, higher-caliber CEOs are assigned to larger companies, which tend to pay more. Second, the traits contribute to pay over and above that driven by firm size. We estimate that 27-58% of the effect of traits on pay comes from CEO’s assignment to larger companies. Our results are consistent with models where the labor market allocates higher-caliber CEOs to more productive positions.

Keywords

CEO, cognitive ability, non-cognitive ability, height, compensation, firm size

Series

Social Sciences Research Network

Available on ECCH

No


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